How evangelicals won a culture war and lost a generation

CNN Belief Blog

Opinion by  Rachel Held Evans , special to CNN

(CNN) — On March 24, World Vision announced that the U.S. branch of the popular humanitarian organization would no longer discriminate against employees in same-sex marriages.

It was a decision that surprised many but one that made sense, given the organization’s ecumenical nature.

But on March 26, World Vision President Richard Stearns reversed the decision, stating, “our board acknowledged that the policy change we made was a mistake.”

Supporters helped the aid group “see that with more clarity,” Stearns added, “and we’re asking you to forgive us for that mistake.”

So what happened within those 48 hours to cause such a sudden reversal?

The Evangelical Machine kicked into gear.

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Millennials Didn’t Abandon Our Institutions — Our Institutions Failed Them | Blog, Connecting the Dots | BillMoyers.com

Millennials Didn’t Abandon Our Institutions — Our Institutions Failed Them | Blog, Connecting the Dots | BillMoyers.com.

The Pew Research Center recentlyreleased a study finding that the Millennial generation – those born between the early 1980s and 2000 – is increasingly alienated from the major institutions of American society. Many are turned off by religion and see little difference between the two major political parties. They’re less trusting of strangers than previous generations. Fewer are tying the knot. Less than half consider themselves patriotic.”

Special report: Taxpayers fund creationism in the classroom – Stephanie Simon – POLITICO.com

Special report: Taxpayers fund creationism in the classroom – Stephanie Simon – POLITICO.com.

“Taxpayers in 14 states will bankroll nearly $1 billion this year in tuition for private schools, including hundreds of religious schools that teach Earth is less than 10,000 years old, Adam and Eve strolled the garden with dinosaurs, and much of modern biology, geology and cosmology is a web of lies.

Now a major push to expand these voucher programs is under way from Alaska to New York, a development that seems certain to sharply increase the investment.”

…this really annoys me.

 

FIRST at Last: Controversial Bill Introduced to Guide U.S. Science Policies | Science/AAAS | News

It’s been nearly 1 year since Representative Lamar Smith (R-TX), who chairs the House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, first circulated his ideas on replacing a 2010 law that touches on key aspects of federal policy toward research and science education. Its draft provisions to alter the National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) peer-review process and restrict funding for social science research elicited howls of protests from the community (also here), and Smith has said repeatedly that he welcomes constructive criticism. Last fall, he held a hearing to solicit outside comment.

via FIRST at Last: Controversial Bill Introduced to Guide U.S. Science Policies | Science/AAAS | News.

If by Rudyard Kipling

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too:
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim,
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same:.
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build’em up with worn-out tools;

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings,
And never breathe a word about your loss:
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much:
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!